Create Account



The Jungle is self-supported by showing advertisements via Google Adsense.
Please consider disabling your advertisement-blocking plugin on the Jungle to help support the site and let us grow!
We also show significantly less advertisements to registered users, so create your account to benefit from this!
Questions or concerns about this ad? Take a screenshot and comment in the thread. We do value your feedback.
We need a Hero

#1

This is how the other none of us live. Tell us about "your" diploma.




Reply

#2

I'm a little irked (jealous) because she's such a privileged little turd. On the other hand I think it's good she's taking advantage of an opportunity to earn her own money by getting endorsement deals as a 'social media influencer', whatever the hell that is. Paris Hilton was a spoiled little trollop, yet she parlayed that lifestyle and reputation into million$ of her own and is a shrewd businesswoman. Look at the Kardashians. They're famous for being famous and make gobs of money. Good for them all, I say. It's the American way. They're harming no one.

The school admissions scam is another argument that I'm too lazy to pursue. Talk amongst yourselves.

[Image: 140207_2724263_Coffee_Talk_Cold_Opening_anvver_4.jpg]
Reply

#3

(03-15-2019, 07:34 PM)homebiscuit Wrote: I'm a little irked (jealous) because she's such a privileged little turd. On the other hand I think it's good she's taking advantage of an opportunity to earn her own money by getting endorsement deals as a 'social media influencer', whatever the hell that is. Paris Hilton was a spoiled little trollop, yet she parlayed that lifestyle and reputation into million$ of her own and is a shrewd businesswoman. Look at the Kardashians. They're famous for being famous and make gobs of money. Good for them all, I say. It's the American way. They're harming no one.

The school admissions scam is another argument that I'm too lazy to pursue. Talk amongst yourselves.

[Image: 140207_2724263_Coffee_Talk_Cold_Opening_anvver_4.jpg]

I’m feeling a little verklempt.
Reply

#4

I had no idea that rich, beautiful, famous people lived differently than us. What a scam.
The urge to save humanity is almost always only a false-face for the urge to rule it. Power is what all messiahs really seek: not the chance to serve. - H.L. Mencken
Reply

#5
(This post was last modified: 03-16-2019, 01:36 PM by Sammy.)

(03-15-2019, 07:34 PM)homebiscuit Wrote: I'm a little irked (jealous) because she's such a privileged little turd. On the other hand I think it's good she's taking advantage of an opportunity to earn her own money by getting endorsement deals as a 'social media influencer', whatever the hell that is. Paris Hilton was a spoiled little trollop, yet she parlayed that lifestyle and reputation into million$ of her own and is a shrewd businesswoman. Look at the Kardashians. They're famous for being famous and make gobs of money. Good for them all, I say. It's the American way. They're harming no one.

The school admissions scam is another argument that I'm too lazy to pursue. Talk amongst yourselves.

[Image: 140207_2724263_Coffee_Talk_Cold_Opening_anvver_4.jpg]


I posted two links, but only one posted. Anyway, I'm fine with her/them making their own money (none of it is mine) ... I'm not fine with them taking class space from kids that work way harder at getting a good and more deserved education. The educational playing field shouldn't be tilted to favor offspring of the rich. The link I posted was from her trip during her first week of school at USC. Instead of being in class her very first week, she was on that trip.
Reply

#6

(03-16-2019, 08:09 AM)flsprtsgod Wrote: I had no idea that rich, beautiful, famous people lived differently than us. What a scam.

Sorry, man ... I missed your post earlier. We certainly know the more money you have, the more famous you are, the more political power you have may lend itself to more than likely having a better life. But it really doesn't always mean living differently in a better way, though I am not sure what definition of "differently" is that you reference. Been a whole lot of people richer than me monetarily, famously, politically ... etc commit suicide, or live their life with severe depression.  Anyway, I wasn't going for that angle in the thread, and wouldn't. I'm pretty sure I understand the more money you have, the better the things in life you can afford.

 
I do hope that the parents (along with college personnel in a bribed position) that broke the law by bribing their children's way into coveted colleges to ultimately push them in front of the more deserving kids (The true victims) are legally held accountable. We can't allow everything to be for sale. If the law doesn't protect your children equally as much as those of the wealthy, then we need better laws. Ha, their lawyers will probably use the Ethan Couch affluenza defense ... Too rich to know better.
Reply

#7

The people you might meet at USC might have better connections, but at the end of the day an engineering degree is an engineering degree and underwater basket weaving degree is underwater basket weaving degree. Whether you get them from old, established, private big City University or directional state.
Just stay away from the newly established for profit colleges.
My fellow southpaw Mark Brunell will probably always be my favorite Jaguar.
Reply

#8
(This post was last modified: 03-19-2019, 01:36 PM by Inziladun.)

(03-16-2019, 06:07 PM)mikesez Wrote: The people you might meet at USC might have better connections, but at the end of the day an engineering degree is an engineering degree and underwater basket weaving degree is underwater basket weaving degree. Whether you get them from old, established, private big City University or directional state.
Just stay away from the newly established for profit colleges.

I feel like this is understated. Especially these days, where your degree comes from matters less and less, it's more about what your degree is in, especially with such a shortage in STEM and Vocational fields. With the exception of some Ivy League schools landing you jobs in prestigious law firms, the difference is really minor for us plebs down here fighting to be middle of the pack.

I got a pretty good gig with a simple IT degree from FSCJ and I'm only at the start of my career. Most people who are driven for success will achieve it in some way or another, even if they don't have a degree. My brother in law was a millionaire at the age of 18 from flipping houses. Used the money to buy into a company and just recently started a second one. I bring it up because I think it's interesting that people who are driven for monetary success usually have very unique personality traits from what I've noticed. Most of us are okay with working 9-5 as long as we don't have to worry about bills too much.
Reply

#9

(03-19-2019, 01:36 PM)Inziladun Wrote:
(03-16-2019, 06:07 PM)mikesez Wrote: The people you might meet at USC might have better connections, but at the end of the day an engineering degree is an engineering degree and underwater basket weaving degree is underwater basket weaving degree. Whether you get them from old, established, private big City University or directional state.
Just stay away from the newly established for profit colleges.

I feel like this is understated. Especially these days, where your degree comes from matters less and less, it's more about what your degree is in, especially with such a shortage in STEM and Vocational fields. With the exception of some Ivy League schools landing you jobs in prestigious law firms, the difference is really minor for us plebs down here fighting to be middle of the pack.

I got a pretty good gig with a simple IT degree from FSCJ and I'm only at the start of my career. Most people who are driven for success will achieve it in some way or another, even if they don't have a degree. My brother in law was a millionaire at the age of 18 from flipping houses. Used the money to buy into a company and just recently started a second one.  I bring it up because I think it's interesting that  people who are driven for monetary success usually have very unique personality traits from what I've noticed. Most of us are okay with working 9-5 as long as we don't have to worry about bills too much.

I think that it's all a matter of perspective and I don't believe that a degree is necessary to be successful.  I guess what I'm saying is that what people view as "successful" differs.  "Success" doesn't mean monetary wealth.  I'm the only one of 4 siblings that doesn't have a degree.  

The oldest (my brother) has a master's degree in theology.  Today he works in an office job and earns a fairly good income in the $75k range (upper middle class income in his area of the country).  He lives a good, comfortable life, rents a place in the downtown metro part of his city and doesn't struggle.

The next one is my sister who has a master's degree in psychology (was at one time close to getting her PHD).  She's a mess and works just enough to get by.  My best guess is she earns something in the $35k-$40k range (pretty much middle class for where she lives), but is very poor when it comes to money management.  She rents cheap apartments and is constantly moving, and always compares herself with others.  She has very low self-esteem and often makes up lies to try to "fit in" with other people.

Next is my other sister that has a master's degree in nursing.  She currently teaches nursing and earns over 6 figures (upper middle class for where she lives) and is doing very well.  Her husband (who also posses a degree in political science and earns over 6 figures) and her are preparing for retirement and own homes/properties in a few different states.  Needless to say they live rather comfortably.

Then there's me.  I never went to college and never had any desire to.  My education came from serving in the Navy as well as reading and "teaching myself".  I have had to teach and train students with electronics engineering degrees and computer science degrees from UF on more than one occasion.  I currently earn over 6 figures and am getting ready to retire myself at an "early" age (mid 50's).  My wife never graduated high school and earns roughly $45k per year here in Jacksonville.  We managed to pay off our home, our vehicles (with the exception of farm equipment) and purchase some property (35 acres) that we work on over the weekends to build our ultimate retirement home.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I agree with you.  I think too much in our society it's stressed that you have to go to college and get a degree to be successful.  Meanwhile, I know many people that followed the same path I did or something similar (trade school) that have had success.  Again, I think the idea of "success" is relative.  Success != monetary wealth.  It's not about what you earn or what you have in the bank.  It's all about creating a comfortable life and being able to retire on your terms and not depend on the government to fund your retirement.


There are 10 kinds of people in this world.  Those who understand binary and those who don't.
Reply

#10

(03-19-2019, 05:16 PM)jagibelieve Wrote:
(03-19-2019, 01:36 PM)Inziladun Wrote: I feel like this is understated. Especially these days, where your degree comes from matters less and less, it's more about what your degree is in, especially with such a shortage in STEM and Vocational fields. With the exception of some Ivy League schools landing you jobs in prestigious law firms, the difference is really minor for us plebs down here fighting to be middle of the pack.

I got a pretty good gig with a simple IT degree from FSCJ and I'm only at the start of my career. Most people who are driven for success will achieve it in some way or another, even if they don't have a degree. My brother in law was a millionaire at the age of 18 from flipping houses. Used the money to buy into a company and just recently started a second one.  I bring it up because I think it's interesting that  people who are driven for monetary success usually have very unique personality traits from what I've noticed. Most of us are okay with working 9-5 as long as we don't have to worry about bills too much.

I think that it's all a matter of perspective and I don't believe that a degree is necessary to be successful.  I guess what I'm saying is that what people view as "successful" differs.  "Success" doesn't mean monetary wealth.  I'm the only one of 4 siblings that doesn't have a degree.  

The oldest (my brother) has a master's degree in theology.  Today he works in an office job and earns a fairly good income in the $75k range (upper middle class income in his area of the country).  He lives a good, comfortable life, rents a place in the downtown metro part of his city and doesn't struggle.

The next one is my sister who has a master's degree in psychology (was at one time close to getting her PHD).  She's a mess and works just enough to get by.  My best guess is she earns something in the $35k-$40k range (pretty much middle class for where she lives), but is very poor when it comes to money management.  She rents cheap apartments and is constantly moving, and always compares herself with others.  She has very low self-esteem and often makes up lies to try to "fit in" with other people.

Next is my other sister that has a master's degree in nursing.  She currently teaches nursing and earns over 6 figures (upper middle class for where she lives) and is doing very well.  Her husband (who also posses a degree in political science and earns over 6 figures) and her are preparing for retirement and own homes/properties in a few different states.  Needless to say they live rather comfortably.

Then there's me.  I never went to college and never had any desire to.  My education came from serving in the Navy as well as reading and "teaching myself".  I have had to teach and train students with electronics engineering degrees and computer science degrees from UF on more than one occasion.  I currently earn over 6 figures and am getting ready to retire myself at an "early" age (mid 50's).  My wife never graduated high school and earns roughly $45k per year here in Jacksonville.  We managed to pay off our home, our vehicles (with the exception of farm equipment) and purchase some property (35 acres) that we work on over the weekends to build our ultimate retirement home.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I agree with you.  I think too much in our society it's stressed that you have to go to college and get a degree to be successful.  Meanwhile, I know many people that followed the same path I did or something similar (trade school) that have had success.  Again, I think the idea of "success" is relative.  Success != monetary wealth.  It's not about what you earn or what you have in the bank.  It's all about creating a comfortable life and being able to retire on your terms and not depend on the government to fund your retirement.
That’s great that you were able to do all that without a degree but at your current job, would you even hire someone today without an engineering degree? Have there been kids who were your age when you started hired today with no degree?

Back when you were starting out, times were simpler. What jobs currently hire kids without college degrees? Fast food? Construction labor?
Reply

#11

(03-19-2019, 07:11 PM)Cleatwood Wrote:
(03-19-2019, 05:16 PM)jagibelieve Wrote: I think that it's all a matter of perspective and I don't believe that a degree is necessary to be successful.  I guess what I'm saying is that what people view as "successful" differs.  "Success" doesn't mean monetary wealth.  I'm the only one of 4 siblings that doesn't have a degree.  

The oldest (my brother) has a master's degree in theology.  Today he works in an office job and earns a fairly good income in the $75k range (upper middle class income in his area of the country).  He lives a good, comfortable life, rents a place in the downtown metro part of his city and doesn't struggle.

The next one is my sister who has a master's degree in psychology (was at one time close to getting her PHD).  She's a mess and works just enough to get by.  My best guess is she earns something in the $35k-$40k range (pretty much middle class for where she lives), but is very poor when it comes to money management.  She rents cheap apartments and is constantly moving, and always compares herself with others.  She has very low self-esteem and often makes up lies to try to "fit in" with other people.

Next is my other sister that has a master's degree in nursing.  She currently teaches nursing and earns over 6 figures (upper middle class for where she lives) and is doing very well.  Her husband (who also posses a degree in political science and earns over 6 figures) and her are preparing for retirement and own homes/properties in a few different states.  Needless to say they live rather comfortably.

Then there's me.  I never went to college and never had any desire to.  My education came from serving in the Navy as well as reading and "teaching myself".  I have had to teach and train students with electronics engineering degrees and computer science degrees from UF on more than one occasion.  I currently earn over 6 figures and am getting ready to retire myself at an "early" age (mid 50's).  My wife never graduated high school and earns roughly $45k per year here in Jacksonville.  We managed to pay off our home, our vehicles (with the exception of farm equipment) and purchase some property (35 acres) that we work on over the weekends to build our ultimate retirement home.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I agree with you.  I think too much in our society it's stressed that you have to go to college and get a degree to be successful.  Meanwhile, I know many people that followed the same path I did or something similar (trade school) that have had success.  Again, I think the idea of "success" is relative.  Success != monetary wealth.  It's not about what you earn or what you have in the bank.  It's all about creating a comfortable life and being able to retire on your terms and not depend on the government to fund your retirement.
That’s great that you were able to do all that without a degree but at your current job, would you even hire someone today without an engineering degree? Have there been kids who were your age when you started hired today with no degree?

Back when you were starting out, times were simpler. What jobs currently hire kids without college degrees? Fast food? Construction labor?

I don't know how JIB will answer but I am guessing the answer would be yes.  I'll take a salty dog ET with a DD-214 and 6 years experience over a college degree every single time all things being equal.  

To your second paragraph; mechanics, electricians, plumbers, welders, truck drivers, heavy equipment operators, you know stuff they teach in Trade Schools and jobs most over educated snobs look down upon.
Original Season Ticket Holder


At some point you just have to let go of what you thought should happen and live in what is happening.
 

Reply

#12

Credential inflation is a thing, and there's no going back.
The urge to save humanity is almost always only a false-face for the urge to rule it. Power is what all messiahs really seek: not the chance to serve. - H.L. Mencken
Reply

#13
(This post was last modified: 03-20-2019, 08:21 AM by Inziladun.)

(03-19-2019, 07:11 PM)Cleatwood Wrote:
(03-19-2019, 05:16 PM)jagibelieve Wrote: I think that it's all a matter of perspective and I don't believe that a degree is necessary to be successful.  I guess what I'm saying is that what people view as "successful" differs.  "Success" doesn't mean monetary wealth.  I'm the only one of 4 siblings that doesn't have a degree.  

The oldest (my brother) has a master's degree in theology.  Today he works in an office job and earns a fairly good income in the $75k range (upper middle class income in his area of the country).  He lives a good, comfortable life, rents a place in the downtown metro part of his city and doesn't struggle.

The next one is my sister who has a master's degree in psychology (was at one time close to getting her PHD).  She's a mess and works just enough to get by.  My best guess is she earns something in the $35k-$40k range (pretty much middle class for where she lives), but is very poor when it comes to money management.  She rents cheap apartments and is constantly moving, and always compares herself with others.  She has very low self-esteem and often makes up lies to try to "fit in" with other people.

Next is my other sister that has a master's degree in nursing.  She currently teaches nursing and earns over 6 figures (upper middle class for where she lives) and is doing very well.  Her husband (who also posses a degree in political science and earns over 6 figures) and her are preparing for retirement and own homes/properties in a few different states.  Needless to say they live rather comfortably.

Then there's me.  I never went to college and never had any desire to.  My education came from serving in the Navy as well as reading and "teaching myself".  I have had to teach and train students with electronics engineering degrees and computer science degrees from UF on more than one occasion.  I currently earn over 6 figures and am getting ready to retire myself at an "early" age (mid 50's).  My wife never graduated high school and earns roughly $45k per year here in Jacksonville.  We managed to pay off our home, our vehicles (with the exception of farm equipment) and purchase some property (35 acres) that we work on over the weekends to build our ultimate retirement home.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I agree with you.  I think too much in our society it's stressed that you have to go to college and get a degree to be successful.  Meanwhile, I know many people that followed the same path I did or something similar (trade school) that have had success.  Again, I think the idea of "success" is relative.  Success != monetary wealth.  It's not about what you earn or what you have in the bank.  It's all about creating a comfortable life and being able to retire on your terms and not depend on the government to fund your retirement.
That’s great that you were able to do all that without a degree but at your current job, would you even hire someone today without an engineering degree? Have there been kids who were your age when you started hired today with no degree?

Back when you were starting out, times were simpler. What jobs currently hire kids without college degrees? Fast food? Construction labor?

I'll bite. In my job field, IT degrees are by and large completely unimportant. This pretty much spans across the entirety of the Computer science field. Mostly it just matters what your experience is. A degree definitely helps getting your foot in the door somewhere, but there's plenty of guys I've worked with that havent had degrees. Personally i could've started my career 5 years sooner with 0 degree, but didn't utilise my connection like a dummy. But I've known guys that have gotten jobs just from creating a little portfolio for themselves over the course of a couple months(made themselves a website, did a little project, ect.)

I guess the answer to your question is: most fields that are desperate for people. You could even be an airline pilot with no college education if you wanted to. Of course nothing is stopping you from making your own business. Online business are increasingly easy to run these days, the trick is finding a niche and scaling the business. There's tons of options available. I think a large problem is that society by and large places a large emphasis on college education. Schools are laughing their way to the bank from all the hype, meanwhile degrees become more and more worthless. I personally wouldn't recommend anyone get a degree if they were walking away with debt because of it.
Reply

#14

When you are on your deathbed, you will still remember experiences from your college days, so nobody should ever regret going to college or let someone convince you that you shouldn't have gone to college. It is easy to think today that you may not have needed your degree, but think back to the first job you had that required that degree that helped open the door to where you are today.

Tucker Carlson proposed a solution that the colleges should share the risk of a student loan. I think this is a great idea that provides incentive to the college to make a greater effort to work with businesses to help funnel graduates into the workforce.

Also, restricting student loans to the bare essentials would be a step in the right direction.
Reply

#15

(03-20-2019, 08:15 AM)Inziladun Wrote:
(03-19-2019, 07:11 PM)Cleatwood Wrote: That’s great that you were able to do all that without a degree but at your current job, would you even hire someone today without an engineering degree? Have there been kids who were your age when you started hired today with no degree?

Back when you were starting out, times were simpler. What jobs currently hire kids without college degrees? Fast food? Construction labor?

I'll bite. In my job field, IT degrees are by and large completely unimportant. This pretty much spans across the entirety of the Computer science field. Mostly it just matters what your experience is. A degree definitely helps getting your foot in the door somewhere, but there's plenty of guys I've worked with that havent had degrees. Personally i could've started my career 5 years sooner with 0 degree, but didn't utilise my connection like a dummy. But I've known guys that have gotten jobs just from creating a little portfolio for themselves over the course of a couple months(made themselves a website, did a little project, ect.)

I guess the answer to your question is: most fields that are desperate for people. You could even be an airline pilot with no college education if you wanted to. Of course nothing is stopping you from making your own business. Online business are increasingly easy to run these days, the trick is finding a niche and scaling the business. There's tons of options available. I think a large problem is that society by and large places a large emphasis on college education. Schools are laughing their way to the bank from all the hype, meanwhile degrees become more and more worthless. I personally wouldn't recommend anyone get a degree if they were walking away with debt because of it.
Just looking through some of the best paying jobs available and there wasn't a single one that didn't require a minimum of a college education. I'm not saying that I agree with it but it just seems to be the way it is now.

Creating your own business sounds find and dandy but how long until you can actually make a profit with said business? 1 year? 2 years? 3 years? How will you make a living when your business isn't turning a profit?
Reply

#16

(03-19-2019, 07:11 PM)Cleatwood Wrote:
(03-19-2019, 05:16 PM)jagibelieve Wrote: I think that it's all a matter of perspective and I don't believe that a degree is necessary to be successful.  I guess what I'm saying is that what people view as "successful" differs.  "Success" doesn't mean monetary wealth.  I'm the only one of 4 siblings that doesn't have a degree.  

The oldest (my brother) has a master's degree in theology.  Today he works in an office job and earns a fairly good income in the $75k range (upper middle class income in his area of the country).  He lives a good, comfortable life, rents a place in the downtown metro part of his city and doesn't struggle.

The next one is my sister who has a master's degree in psychology (was at one time close to getting her PHD).  She's a mess and works just enough to get by.  My best guess is she earns something in the $35k-$40k range (pretty much middle class for where she lives), but is very poor when it comes to money management.  She rents cheap apartments and is constantly moving, and always compares herself with others.  She has very low self-esteem and often makes up lies to try to "fit in" with other people.

Next is my other sister that has a master's degree in nursing.  She currently teaches nursing and earns over 6 figures (upper middle class for where she lives) and is doing very well.  Her husband (who also posses a degree in political science and earns over 6 figures) and her are preparing for retirement and own homes/properties in a few different states.  Needless to say they live rather comfortably.

Then there's me.  I never went to college and never had any desire to.  My education came from serving in the Navy as well as reading and "teaching myself".  I have had to teach and train students with electronics engineering degrees and computer science degrees from UF on more than one occasion.  I currently earn over 6 figures and am getting ready to retire myself at an "early" age (mid 50's).  My wife never graduated high school and earns roughly $45k per year here in Jacksonville.  We managed to pay off our home, our vehicles (with the exception of farm equipment) and purchase some property (35 acres) that we work on over the weekends to build our ultimate retirement home.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I agree with you.  I think too much in our society it's stressed that you have to go to college and get a degree to be successful.  Meanwhile, I know many people that followed the same path I did or something similar (trade school) that have had success.  Again, I think the idea of "success" is relative.  Success != monetary wealth.  It's not about what you earn or what you have in the bank.  It's all about creating a comfortable life and being able to retire on your terms and not depend on the government to fund your retirement.
That’s great that you were able to do all that without a degree but at your current job, would you even hire someone today without an engineering degree? Have there been kids who were your age when you started hired today with no degree?

Back when you were starting out, times were simpler. What jobs currently hire kids without college degrees? Fast food? Construction labor?

To answer your question honestly, yes I would hire someone with no degree.  As of matter of fact, only 1 out of the dozen people that work for me has a degree... an art degree.  With that being said, my job is kind of unique.  All of us that work here are prior military.  We don't really have any "entry level" positions here (other than guards and janitors).  To answer your second question, the last person hired was 23 years old at the time (former service in the USMC).  Some technical training and experience are all that is really required at my work-center, no degree.


There are 10 kinds of people in this world.  Those who understand binary and those who don't.
Reply

#17

(03-19-2019, 07:11 PM)Cleatwood Wrote:
(03-19-2019, 05:16 PM)jagibelieve Wrote: I think that it's all a matter of perspective and I don't believe that a degree is necessary to be successful.  I guess what I'm saying is that what people view as "successful" differs.  "Success" doesn't mean monetary wealth.  I'm the only one of 4 siblings that doesn't have a degree.  

The oldest (my brother) has a master's degree in theology.  Today he works in an office job and earns a fairly good income in the $75k range (upper middle class income in his area of the country).  He lives a good, comfortable life, rents a place in the downtown metro part of his city and doesn't struggle.

The next one is my sister who has a master's degree in psychology (was at one time close to getting her PHD).  She's a mess and works just enough to get by.  My best guess is she earns something in the $35k-$40k range (pretty much middle class for where she lives), but is very poor when it comes to money management.  She rents cheap apartments and is constantly moving, and always compares herself with others.  She has very low self-esteem and often makes up lies to try to "fit in" with other people.

Next is my other sister that has a master's degree in nursing.  She currently teaches nursing and earns over 6 figures (upper middle class for where she lives) and is doing very well.  Her husband (who also posses a degree in political science and earns over 6 figures) and her are preparing for retirement and own homes/properties in a few different states.  Needless to say they live rather comfortably.

Then there's me.  I never went to college and never had any desire to.  My education came from serving in the Navy as well as reading and "teaching myself".  I have had to teach and train students with electronics engineering degrees and computer science degrees from UF on more than one occasion.  I currently earn over 6 figures and am getting ready to retire myself at an "early" age (mid 50's).  My wife never graduated high school and earns roughly $45k per year here in Jacksonville.  We managed to pay off our home, our vehicles (with the exception of farm equipment) and purchase some property (35 acres) that we work on over the weekends to build our ultimate retirement home.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I agree with you.  I think too much in our society it's stressed that you have to go to college and get a degree to be successful.  Meanwhile, I know many people that followed the same path I did or something similar (trade school) that have had success.  Again, I think the idea of "success" is relative.  Success != monetary wealth.  It's not about what you earn or what you have in the bank.  It's all about creating a comfortable life and being able to retire on your terms and not depend on the government to fund your retirement.
That’s great that you were able to do all that without a degree but at your current job, would you even hire someone today without an engineering degree? Have there been kids who were your age when you started hired today with no degree?

Back when you were starting out, times were simpler. What jobs currently hire kids without college degrees? Fast food? Construction labor?

A/C repair, plumber, lawn service, i.e. most home improvement jobs. If you expand the list to jobs that require school-type training but not a degree, then you get a lot more. Truck driver pays well, but will soon to be replaced by self-driving trucks.

But you are right in the sense that a lot of jobs that formerly didn't require a college degree, now do. That evolved as a way around the affirmative action laws.



                                                                          

"Why should I give information to you when all you want to do is find something wrong with it?"
Reply

#18

(03-20-2019, 08:29 AM)StroudCrowd1 Wrote: When you are on your deathbed, you will still remember experiences from your college days, so nobody should ever regret going to college or let someone convince you that you shouldn't have gone to college.  It is easy to think today that you may not have needed your degree, but think back to the first job you had that required that degree that helped open the door to where you are today.

Tucker Carlson proposed a solution that the colleges should share the risk of a student loan. I think this is a great idea that provides incentive to the college to make a greater effort to work with businesses to help funnel graduates into the workforce.

Also, restricting student loans to the bare essentials would be a step in the right direction.

I couldn't agree more.  I think government backed loans should only be given to students in a ratio with university backed loans.  Probably 1:1.  Those universities need to have skin in the game.  And those loans should be every bit as hard to discharge as the government backed ones.
My fellow southpaw Mark Brunell will probably always be my favorite Jaguar.
Reply

#19
(This post was last modified: 03-21-2019, 09:41 AM by Inziladun.)

(03-20-2019, 08:37 AM)Cleatwood Wrote:
(03-20-2019, 08:15 AM)Inziladun Wrote: I'll bite. In my job field, IT degrees are by and large completely unimportant. This pretty much spans across the entirety of the Computer science field. Mostly it just matters what your experience is. A degree definitely helps getting your foot in the door somewhere, but there's plenty of guys I've worked with that havent had degrees. Personally i could've started my career 5 years sooner with 0 degree, but didn't utilise my connection like a dummy. But I've known guys that have gotten jobs just from creating a little portfolio for themselves over the course of a couple months(made themselves a website, did a little project, ect.)

I guess the answer to your question is: most fields that are desperate for people. You could even be an airline pilot with no college education if you wanted to. Of course nothing is stopping you from making your own business. Online business are increasingly easy to run these days, the trick is finding a niche and scaling the business. There's tons of options available. I think a large problem is that society by and large places a large emphasis on college education. Schools are laughing their way to the bank from all the hype, meanwhile degrees become more and more worthless. I personally wouldn't recommend anyone get a degree if they were walking away with debt because of it.
Just looking through some of the best paying jobs available and there wasn't a single one that didn't require a minimum of a college education. I'm not saying that I agree with it but it just seems to be the way it is now.

Creating your own business sounds find and dandy but how long until you can actually make a profit with said business? 1 year? 2 years? 3 years? How will you make a living when your business isn't turning a profit?

Based on my Google search it seems like the "highest paying jobs" are just a bunch of specialized medical doctors, a quarter of which will be replaced by robots in a few decades. So I'm not sure how to respond. There's plenty of jobs that pay six figures with no college education required. Sure you may not make as much as a surgeon, but driving a new Bentley every year is overrated. 

I mean it depends. Personally I started turning a profit in my business by the end of the first month. My problem was scaling it. But it generates an extra 2-4 thousand dollars a month for me and most of it is automated and I have 0 employees. I'm not saying it's for everyone and you'd need to find your own little market niche, but I honestly feel like there's plenty of options to make a decent living for someone without a degree, you just need to be motivated. Same thing as if you had a degree. A lot of graduates walk out of college and are expecting to be handed a job. Those that are motivated get rewarded over those that are not, degree or not.
Reply




Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

The Jungle is self-supported by showing advertisements via Google Adsense.
Please consider disabling your advertisement-blocking plugin on the Jungle to help support the site and let us grow!
We also show less advertisements to registered users, so create your account to benefit from this!
Questions or concerns about this ad? Take a screenshot and comment in the thread. We do value your feedback.


ABOUT US
The Jungle Forums is the Jaguars' biggest fan message board. Talking about the Jags since 2006, the Jungle was the team-endorsed home of all things Jaguars.

Since 2017, the Jungle is now independent of the team but still run by the same crew. We are here to support and discuss all things Jaguars and all things Duval!