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3 veterans kill themselves on Department of Veterans Affairs property in 5 days

#1

https://thenewsrep.com/116271/so-other-v...in-5-days/

3 veterans kill themselves  on Veteran Affairs Property in 5 days This needs to be addressed immediately.   Lately, I've been watching documentaries detailing the events of Aleppo (Syria) and Mosul City (Iraq) and there is no way we can expect our troops to return from battles such as this or other wars in a normal psychological manner.  Heck, I get shell shocked (for a lack of a better term) just watching the documentaries on YouTube TV.
 
"There were 19 suicides reported on VA campuses nationwide between October of 2017 and November of 2018, with an average of slightly more than 20 veterans ending their own lives per day across the country."
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#2
(This post was last modified: 04-15-2019, 09:59 AM by The Drifter.)

If we can send Boys off to fight the wars, we should take care of the MEN that return. The hell with worrying about illegals take care of our own first and foremost!
I'll have a Johnnie Walker Black, neat, straight up
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#3

"Many veteran suicides occur without the veteran ever even entering into the VA’s system, which, one could contend, was the point of those millions of dollars allocated for public outreach. The point remains, the VA can’t help veterans that don’t seek it."

 As a suicide survivor I can tell you that when I was in the "black hole" I was being treated by a psych doctor but it didn't matter. It didn't help. When you're that far gone you don't always see the need for help you're so consumed by the depression, anxiety, etc. In the back of my mind I knew I needed more comprehensive help, I just couldn't verbalize it. I was also one of those who thought people who committed suicide were weak and I would never be that person. 

Until I was. 

I look back on it all now and, even though I lived it, I still can't believe or understand how desperate I was. The experience definitely gave me insight into a lot of things I didn't and couldn't understand before. I was hospitalized twice. Once for the initial attempt and again a month or two after my discharge. I knew I was still a danger to myself and admitted myself the second time. The help may be there but sometimes the people are so damaged they can't see it. 
Ya, you betcha.
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#4

(04-15-2019, 12:14 PM)americus 2.0 Wrote: "Many veteran suicides occur without the veteran ever even entering into the VA’s system, which, one could contend, was the point of those millions of dollars allocated for public outreach. The point remains, the VA can’t help veterans that don’t seek it."

 As a suicide survivor I can tell you that when I was in the "black hole" I was being treated by a psych doctor but it didn't matter. It didn't help. When you're that far gone you don't always see the need for help you're so consumed by the depression, anxiety, etc. In the back of my mind I knew I needed more comprehensive help, I just couldn't verbalize it. I was also one of those who thought people who committed suicide were weak and I would never be that person. 

Until I was. 

I look back on it all now and, even though I lived it, I still can't believe or understand how desperate I was. The experience definitely gave me insight into a lot of things I didn't and couldn't understand before. I was hospitalized twice. Once for the initial attempt and again a month or two after my discharge. I knew I was still a danger to myself and admitted myself the second time. The help may be there but sometimes the people are so damaged they can't see it. 

This really can't be stressed enough.  With the level of self-reliance we train into our troops, a lot of times they figure they can deal with the trauma's they've experienced on their own.  Many self medicate, and sadly, many end up a statistic.  I'm not sure how you address an issue unless someone actually seeks help.  Sadly, in the instances above, these folks were trying to get help and just didn't get there soon enough.  It's a tragic footnote to the wars we've been fighting for almost 20 years.
Never argue with idiots. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.
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#5

(04-15-2019, 12:14 PM)americus 2.0 Wrote: "Many veteran suicides occur without the veteran ever even entering into the VA’s system, which, one could contend, was the point of those millions of dollars allocated for public outreach. The point remains, the VA can’t help veterans that don’t seek it."

 As a suicide survivor I can tell you that when I was in the "black hole" I was being treated by a psych doctor but it didn't matter. It didn't help. When you're that far gone you don't always see the need for help you're so consumed by the depression, anxiety, etc. In the back of my mind I knew I needed more comprehensive help, I just couldn't verbalize it. I was also one of those who thought people who committed suicide were weak and I would never be that person. 

Until I was. 

I look back on it all now and, even though I lived it, I still can't believe or understand how desperate I was. The experience definitely gave me insight into a lot of things I didn't and couldn't understand before. I was hospitalized twice. Once for the initial attempt and again a month or two after my discharge. I knew I was still a danger to myself and admitted myself the second time. The help may be there but sometimes the people are so damaged they can't see it. 
I'm very glad you failed.
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#6

(04-15-2019, 01:07 PM)Cleatwood Wrote:
(04-15-2019, 12:14 PM)americus 2.0 Wrote: "Many veteran suicides occur without the veteran ever even entering into the VA’s system, which, one could contend, was the point of those millions of dollars allocated for public outreach. The point remains, the VA can’t help veterans that don’t seek it."

 As a suicide survivor I can tell you that when I was in the "black hole" I was being treated by a psych doctor but it didn't matter. It didn't help. When you're that far gone you don't always see the need for help you're so consumed by the depression, anxiety, etc. In the back of my mind I knew I needed more comprehensive help, I just couldn't verbalize it. I was also one of those who thought people who committed suicide were weak and I would never be that person. 

Until I was. 

I look back on it all now and, even though I lived it, I still can't believe or understand how desperate I was. The experience definitely gave me insight into a lot of things I didn't and couldn't understand before. I was hospitalized twice. Once for the initial attempt and again a month or two after my discharge. I knew I was still a danger to myself and admitted myself the second time. The help may be there but sometimes the people are so damaged they can't see it. 
I'm very glad you failed.

Absolutely second this. You add value on this board and in life too. If anyone else came across this I would hope they would believe that.


Yes, it's improvement, but it's Blaine Gabbert 2012 level improvement. - Pirkster

http://youtu.be/ouGM3NWpjxk The Home Hypnotist!

http://youtu.be/XQRFkn0Ly3A Media on the Brain Link!
 
Quote:Peyton must store oxygen in that forehead of his. No way I'd still be alive after all that choking.
 
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#7

(04-15-2019, 12:14 PM)americus 2.0 Wrote: "Many veteran suicides occur without the veteran ever even entering into the VA’s system, which, one could contend, was the point of those millions of dollars allocated for public outreach. The point remains, the VA can’t help veterans that don’t seek it."

 As a suicide survivor I can tell you that when I was in the "black hole" I was being treated by a psych doctor but it didn't matter. It didn't help. When you're that far gone you don't always see the need for help you're so consumed by the depression, anxiety, etc. In the back of my mind I knew I needed more comprehensive help, I just couldn't verbalize it. I was also one of those who thought people who committed suicide were weak and I would never be that person. 

Until I was. 

I look back on it all now and, even though I lived it, I still can't believe or understand how desperate I was. The experience definitely gave me insight into a lot of things I didn't and couldn't understand before. I was hospitalized twice. Once for the initial attempt and again a month or two after my discharge. I knew I was still a danger to myself and admitted myself the second time. The help may be there but sometimes the people are so damaged they can't see it. 

Wow .. that's pretty powerful.  I second the comment regarding we're glad you're still with us !!
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#8

As someone still tied to the Special Operation community, I can tell you that the problem is not and most likely will not go away any time soon. The issues cannot just be chalked up to combat or the like. The military is a microcosm of society as a whole. This means there is a group of young folks with mental health needs, there are cases of sexual assault, there is sometimes spouse violence, there are marriage failures, etc. Where I see the difference, being such a small community really amps up the peer pressure and the stigma related to reporting or getting help. It isn't that services are lacking, it is that a strong-willed individual doesn't want to let their team down or their family down and chooses to try and internalize to challenge it on their own. Here at SOCOM, we have already had 4 individuals succeed at attempting to relieve the pain. With embedded mental health professionals and constant reviews here, it is hard to imagine a more effective way to identify and help. Hearing the sirens running in the am has really become such a negative event as there is always that thought in the back of your mind...not again!

Sadly, the VA does a good job of the identification of mental health issues but their follow through is nearly non-existent. They try and throw pills at you while shying away from the counseling that should go hand in hand with it. There is also a catch-22 here in that the member must take responsibility for taking their meds and getting themselves to appointments. We also have to remember that most of these men and woman were part of something greater than themselves and once disconnected from that duty it is hard to fill that void. This is where things can become devastating. In any case, the same drive, pride, and strength that makes most military members successful are actually the weaknesses that make treatments difficult.

Americus, thanks for sharing. That is very difficult to do. It shows that you have taken huge strides since those dark days and I sincerely hope those days are behind you and that you are continuing to strengthen as the days go by. It is almost certain that someone will find strength in what you have shared with us. If you ever feel the need to vent, feel free to PM me and I'll be an open ear.
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#9

Do they try to force these soldiers to get psych evaluations before discharging them? Should they?
My fellow southpaw Mark Brunell will probably always be my favorite Jaguar.
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#10

(04-16-2019, 10:26 AM)mikesez Wrote: Do they try to force these soldiers to get psych evaluations before discharging them? Should they?
As to our community, it is a constant. There are professionals embedded and at a fingertips reach before, during and after deployments or heavy training. A thorough medical evaluation is conducted before discharge and depending on your reason for leaving. At the very least, treatments are available free of charge for six months after. After that expires, there are numerous avenues for free treatment. This can be a problem as now it falls to the hands of the member to seek that treatment. If the member made it to the VA as part of their outprocessing, there is usually an assigned VA representative (most times prior srevice) that follows up monthly with your status and is available to you to contact at any time. Additionally, the DoD has done a decent job of recognizing the issues associated with leaving military service and returning to the civilian world. All services provide a week to two week long mandatory seperation class that goes over topics related to medical, insurance, education, finances, and employment. Unfortunately, there isn't a one size fits all approach or magic pill and those in the most amount of pain hide it very well!
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#11

Thanks for the encouragement guys. I feel it is my duty to share my story because it may help someone else, and to break the cycle of stigma associated with seeking help and/or being hospitalized. I'm no less of a person for any of it and I want others to understand they aren't either. 

I will likely always live with anxiety and depression and that's okay. I'm in a good place now mentally. I have a great husband, a stable life, my faith, my family and friends. These days my biggest complaint is not recovering fast enough from bowel resection surgery I had in September. That can get in my head from time to time because I'm a very active person, but I just have to remember it takes time and every day that passes is a day moving forward....even when I have a day that feels like a total setback I am moving forward.
Ya, you betcha.
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